An Exposition of Edmund Burke’s On Taste

Edmund Burke’s On Taste is a brief philosophical essay on aesthetics that was released in 1757 as a preface to his more notable “A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful.” The telos of his essay was to discern whether such principles of taste exist that are so common and fixed so as to allow fruitful reasoning on them (13 Burke). The work is important because, as he so reasons, all conjectures on the matter of the principles of taste would be fruitless if we cannot first establish that there are grounded and common principles among all humans. If this argument does not succeed, the whole matter of his Enquiry into the Sublime and the Beautiful is nullified. Before beginning his endeavor, he takes taste to mean “that faculty or those faculties of the mind, which are affected with, or which form a judgment of, the works of imagination and the elegant arts” (12-3). The purpose of this essay is clarify Burke’s arguments on the matter.

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Basics of Sales: Building Rapport

The ability to build rapport with a customer is an essential component to the sales conversation. Rapport is a mutual bond and understanding between ourselves and the customer. It is paramount for a number of reasons. Chiefly, it helps customers to trust us in our recommendations to them and that trust lays the foundation for a successful sales conversation. It also makes them more inclined to focus on what we’re presenting them and to listen with attentiveness. Finally, it allows us to show the customer that what we’re doing is in their best interest and the customer is more inclined to believe that if we’ve established rapport. Here, we will examine the many ways in which rapport can be built and give consideration to special circumstances (such as building rapport with angry customers).

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Basics of Sales: Confidence

Confidence is an essential component to the sales conversation. Success in sales depends highly on it because confidence in yourself and in your product is what makes your customer trust your judgments, your recommendations, and your products. Confidence is what makes you sound knowledgeable and supportive of what you’re selling. Not only this but when you’re confident, it allows your customer to feel confident as well in their decision to buy from you. As you can no doubt imagine, a salesperson who lacks confidence will almost always be met by customers with hesitation and apprehension. Would you be inclined to purchase something from someone who wasn’t sure of what they were talking about? The scope of this essay is to explore ways in which confidence is exuded and additionally practical tips for building confidence.

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Basics of Sales: Use a Sales Process

One of the most crucial requirements for being a successful salesperson is to use a sales process. There are a number of different sales processes out there which all vary in complexity but, regardless, having any kind of repeatable process is essential for success. One reason is immediately apparent: success is consistent only when behaviors are consistent. A sales process is a set of behaviors and, when implemented consistently, will lead to consistent outcomes. Outside of its instrumental value in producing similar results, a sales process is the best way of efficiently selling and continuing to improve one’s sales techniques.

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Uzumaki: A Note on Impossible First-Hand Accounts

The suspension of disbelief is important for any compelling story. The audience must be, in a sense, tricked into believing the fiction that the creator has weaved. Stories are more compelling as this is done better. It seems reasonable to conclude, then, that such an incongruity as the narration of events that could never be narrated would shatter this suspension of disbelief. If the narration is presented as a first-hand testimony of, say, the French Revolution, but then they begin by stating that they were born centuries after its occurrence, the audience would have no reason to believe or be invested in the story because of the shattering of this suspension. Despite this, the peculiar thing about what Junji Ito does in their work, Uzumaki, is compellingly present a first-hand account of the story’s events that impossible. By the way that this impossible first-hand account is employed, Junji Ito still reasonably suspends the audience’s disbelief, enhances the emotional force of the story, and creates interesting opportunities for plot exposition.

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Kaufman’s Reflection and Projection of Subjective Experience

In film, it is often taken for granted that each scene shown to the audience is an accurate depiction of the events in the story. That is, in following the protagonist throughout the plot of a film, the audience witnesses the film’s events as they actually occur. This status quo is flipped on its head by Charlie Kaufman, director and writer of Anomalisa and Synecdoche, New York. In both Anomalisa and Synecdoche, New York, the audience witnesses the plot through the eyes of the protagonist, whether this is done subtly or overtly. The difference created by this change in narration results in a more efficient communication of the character’s state of mind and a more relatable and engrossing frame of reference.

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