Basics of Sales: Use a Sales Process

One of the most crucial requirements for being a successful salesperson is to use a sales process. There are a number of different sales processes out there which all vary in complexity but, regardless, having any kind of repeatable process is essential for success. One reason is immediately apparent: success is consistent only when behaviors are consistent. A sales process is a set of behaviors and, when implemented consistently, will lead to consistent outcomes. Outside of its instrumental value in producing similar results, a sales process is the best way of efficiently selling and continuing to improve one’s sales techniques.

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Uzumaki: A Note on Impossible First-Hand Accounts

The suspension of disbelief is important for any compelling story. The audience must be, in a sense, tricked into believing the fiction that the creator has weaved. Stories are more compelling as this is done better. It seems reasonable to conclude, then, that such an incongruity as the narration of events that could never be narrated would shatter this suspension of disbelief. If the narration is presented as a first-hand testimony of, say, the French Revolution, but then they begin by stating that they were born centuries after its occurrence, the audience would have no reason to believe or be invested in the story because of the shattering of this suspension. Despite this, the peculiar thing about what Junji Ito does in their work, Uzumaki, is compellingly present a first-hand account of the story’s events that impossible. By the way that this impossible first-hand account is employed, Junji Ito still reasonably suspends the audience’s disbelief, enhances the emotional force of the story, and creates interesting opportunities for plot exposition.

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Kaufman’s Reflection and Projection of Subjective Experience

In film, it is often taken for granted that each scene shown to the audience is an accurate depiction of the events in the story. That is, in following the protagonist throughout the plot of a film, the audience witnesses the film’s events as they actually occur. This status quo is flipped on its head by Charlie Kaufman, director and writer of Anomalisa and Synecdoche, New York. In both Anomalisa and Synecdoche, New York, the audience witnesses the plot through the eyes of the protagonist, whether this is done subtly or overtly. The difference created by this change in narration results in a more efficient communication of the character’s state of mind and a more relatable and engrossing frame of reference.

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The Individualism of Early Liberal Thinkers

Early liberal thought, especially as it has been argued through Thomas Hobbes and John Locke, have identified human nature as inherently individualistic and self-motivated. Each liberal thinker in their stead has offered some interpretation of this individual and how that relates to the natural condition of humans outside of society. This essay will explore the main features of those varying conceptions but, due to the broad nature of the essay, it will not examine all the related arguments about human nature. It should be additionally noted that in the discussion of John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor, their individual works will be treated as representative of both of them (except where explicitly stated) as they largely held the same philosophical views and co-authored many of their works together (Miller). Finally, it will be explicitly mentioned here that all of the discussed philosophers, with the exception of Karl Marx, emphasize human nature as individualistic. This can be noted implicitly by the features of their human nature. Ultimately, liberal thinkers have conceived of humans as naturally individualistic, equal to one another, and selfish, with later feminist thinkers (such as Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Taylor) focusing on including women as equals in human nature and one socialist thinker, Karl Marx, rejecting this individualism and selfishness entirely.

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Hobbes and Locke on Human Nature and Their Necessitated Governments

Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are two English philosophers who were important proponents of classical liberalism. They conceived of humans as existing in a state of nature by default and that it was by their doing that societies were formed. This was accomplished through a social contract in which individuals gave up some rights in order for a state that was to their benefit. This essentially repositioned political legitimacy as arising from the consent of the governed. This essay particularly explores how Hobbes and Locke’s conceptions of the state of nature led each to propose very different governments for correcting their problems, with Hobbes supporting a coercive authority and Locke supporting an impartial authority limited by an obligation to protect the property of citizens.

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